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millions of people grapple today with the impact of superstorm sandy. the extent of the damage still not known. on this day after. >> the death count is now at 38. with the potential to climb. the storm's punishing winds and rain knocked out power to more than 8 million people in 20 states. in new jersey, water flowing over a levee led to the evacuation of hundreds of people. and new york, the city tt never sleeps is just now waking up after a night and day in the dark. >> new york's mayor referred to the storm as devastating. though the worst has passed now, we're still feeling some of the impact. this wall of clouds, shot by chopper 4 over rockville today. >> veronica johnson is in our weather center with the very latest. >> sandy has weakened but it is not quite done with us yet. we're seeing creeks, streams, rivers, all rise. coming up in a couple moments, we'll talk about the specifics of which ones, where, and how cold it will get tonight. >> in new york, flooding surpassed what forecasters predicted in a worst-case scenario. jay gray is live with a look at the damage thr
tonight, renewed calls for help in the northeast from the wrath of hurricane sandy. good afternoon, everyone, i'm jim handly. >> i'm pat lawson muse. 37 in new york city alone, more than 4 million people are still without power. and countless more hours of cleanup are still ahead for many. >> as the recovery ramps up right now, jay gray has more on the potential bad news in the forecast. >> reporter: where the damage is so intense, so far reaching, it can be hard to figure out how to even start to come back. >> you see their whole livelihoods crash into the ocean. it's devastating. >> reporter: in many areas, crews are moving the mess that sandy left behind. but in some of the hardest hit communities, like seaside heights, new jersey, there are no recovery teams or residents yet, and frustrations are building. >> why safe there and nowhere else? talk to the rest of the homeowners. >> the gas mains we're scared of. >> i don't care about a house, i care about your lives. >> reporter: lives, that like the atlantic coast have been battered and torn apart. >> no electricity, no heat, no
over the shock of what sandy left behind and understanding that the recovery here is going to be difficult and not going to be weeks but months if not more than a year. there is a bit of good news here in atlantic city. the casinos reopened. and a lot of people, you'd be surprised, moving in, saying they're going to find a place to stay here. the hotels are open. but also hoping they can get their minds off what's happened and what's to come for just a couple of hours. so that's a bit of good news in the middle of what's been a lot of horrible news. pat, jim, back to you. >> all right. jay gray. jay, thank you. >>> about 1,500 dominion virginia workers left this morning to help restore power in central new jersey. hundreds of thousands there still in the dark after sandy. many of these crews also responded after hurricane katrina because so many gas stations are powerless now, they are taking their own fuel and other supplies with them up to jersey. they will work shifts of at least 12 hours. >>> four days to go until election day. there are nine swing states, but only one
problems created by super storm sandy. good afternoon. >> first up today, gray skies over the eastern seaboard gave ato sunshine today, but the dark mood over parts of new york and new jersey persists. the death toll up to at least 50. more than 6 million homes, including 4 million in new york and new jersey, remain without power at this hour. president obama got a firsthand look at the damage today. >> the stock exchange running on generator power came back to life. the mayor gave a thumbs up and rang the opening bell to the sound of cheers. >> and more troubles. this is the scene in the coastal community of seaside heights, new jersey, where hundreds of homes were knocked off their foundations. >> and this is the scene near bayhead, new jersey, a community under water there and cut off as the atlantic ocean merged with another waterway. homes, once million-dollar homes, now worthless. we get the latest from new jersey and jay gray. >> reporter: good evening. this is the kind of devastation that hundreds of thousands are working through right now, the start of what is sure to be a lo
average, as we move through the rest of today and tomorrow. again, all with sandy making its way ashore in the next couple of minutes, we think, around cape may, southern area of new jersey, north of rehoboth. and that weather front off to the west, kind of just stalled there for a while. so that's the way it's looking right now. i've got a lot more coming up in just a couple of minutes. jim, pat, back to you. >> we are riding it out in rehoboth with wendy rieger. she is standing by live on the beach. again, you showed us massive waves a short time ago, wendy. where are you now? >> reporter: i'm actually down -- my producer thought it was just too cushy on the balcony, next to a warm room. and decided it would be more interesting to have me on the beach. actually, i wanted to come down journalistically, because i wanted to observe these big waves. and veronica, ver usely, is absolutely right, this thing has changed just in the last 15 minutes. the rain is almost painfully pelting us. and while the massive waves have calmed down a little bit, i'm sure they'll be picking up again. as we g
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5